URBAN AFFORESTATION

THE BEAUTY OF TREES

TREES ARE CROSS-CUTTING MEASURES

1. Trees cool the city helping to prevent urban heat build-up adapting the city to the changing climate.

 

 2. Trees drawdown carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and store it in their bio-mass so they mitigate climate change too. 

THE HARVARD STUDIO RECOMMENDS THE

MIYAWAKI MINI-FOREST PLANTING METHOD

1. Plant young trees very densely in continuous trenches so the roots can grow as they would in the true forest.

 

 2. Inoculate the soil with bacteria and fungi that facilitate the uptake of nutrients plus creates a network ha aids in communication between trees in the root zone as in a real forest. This network is called: The wood wide web!

3. Trees planted this way grow rapidly and create healthy stands of vegetation. (See background image of Miyawaki Method being used in Mumbai).

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WHY IS PLANTING A MINI-FOREST BETTER THAN PUTTING TREES INTO INDIVIDUAL HOLES LIKE WE USUALLY DO IN CITIES?

Follow the link below!

CLICK HERE TO SEE WHY

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Miyawaki type mini-urban forests are used in the conceptual public realm plan to buffer neighbourhoods from industrial and commercial zones plus at dead end streets that back onto the new Loop district.

THE CONWAY SCHOOL

GREEN STREETS GUIDEBOOK

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The Conway School of Landscape Design, in Western Massachusetts, developed guidelines in 2014 for urban afforestation of many of Holyoke’s downtown streetscape corridors with the intention to help cool the most vulnerable neighborhoods and create greater social environ-mental equity, by addressing urban heat isalnd effects (UHIE).  

 

The proposals in the Conway plan developed very coherent streetscape recommendations which were reviewed by the Harvard Option Studio.  

 

This led to aspects of the Conway School study being incorporated into but  also expanded upon in the Harvard Option Studio Public Realm Master Plan.

Click on the icon below to download the full report: